Who Signed The Tashkent Agreement And When

On January 10, 1966, the Tashkent Declaration between India and Pakistan was signed after the unsuccessful 1965 war. This article will provide details of the historical statement as part of the IAS audit. In India, the people also criticized the agreement because the Pakistani president and the Indian prime minister did not sign a guerrilla pact in Kashmir. After the day of this declaration, Prime Minister Lal Bahadur died on the day of a sudden heart attack. After him, no one accepted this statement, and it was ignored by the next government. The first Indo-Pakistan War, known as the First Kashmir War (October 22, 1947-January 5, 1949), took place shortly after the independence of India and Pakistan. A ceasefire agreement has led to the establishment of the Line of Control (LOC) as the de facto border between India and Pakistan in Kashmir. The agreement was criticized in India because it contained no war pact or renouncement of guerrilla warfare in Kashmir. After the signing of the agreement, Indian Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri mysteriously died in Tashkent. [3] Shasti`s sudden death led to persistent conspiracy theories that he was poisoned. [7] The Indian government refused to downgrade a report on his death claiming that it could harm foreign relations, cause disruption in the country and a violation of parliamentary privileges.

[7] An agreement signed by Indian Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri and Pakistani President Ayub Khan in the Soviet city of Tashkent to end the Second Indo-Pakistan War on Kashmir. The two countries agreed not only to withdraw their troops from the territory of the other region and to recover their prisoners of war, but also to begin to normalize their diplomatic relations. Unfortunately, the beginning of Indo-Pakistani friendly relations was made more difficult by Shastri`s death a few hours after the signing of the agreement. The agreement has done little to ease the deep hostility between the two countries since independence in 1947 and did not prevent the outbreak of new hostilities in 1970.